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Citing Articles from DHS Library Subscription Databases
 
 
 
 
Cite online journal articles from an online database as you would a print one. Provide the database name in italics. Library information is no longer required; neither is the URL [unless your teacher requires it]. List the medium of publication as Web and end with the date of access. Below are some examples. Keep in mind that there are several variations on the basic format, as there are numerous databases. Some contain reprinted information and others list a  “Database Company” i.e. all Facts On File databases.
 


Full Text Articles from an Online Database
Author, First. "Title of Article in Quotes with All Important Words Capitalized." Name of the Periodical Italicized with All

       Important Words Capitalized
Volume Issue number (if given) (Year): pages (if not given, use n. pag.). Name of

       Database Italicized
. Medium of Publication (Web). Date of access (Day, Month, Year). <URL>. 

Berger, James D. and Helmut J. Schmidt. “Regulation of Macronuclear DNA Content in Paramecium Tetraurelia.” The

       Journal of Cell Biology
76.1 (1978): 116-126. Infotrac. Web. 20 Nov. 2008.

Jones, Robert. “Work-Related Asthma.” American Family Physician 64 (2001): 1839-52. HealthReferenceCenter.

        InfoTrac.
Web. 20 Nov. 2008.


Kort, Carol. “Lee, Harper.” A to Z of American Writers. New York: Facts on File, Inc. (2000): n. pag. Facts On File, Inc.

       Literary Reference Online.
Web. 20 Nov. 2008.


Nicas, Jack.  "They'd Rather Switch Than Fight : School to Replace Its Look-Alike Logo. " Boston Globe 28  Oct. 2009.

       ProQuest
. Web.  13 Oct. 2009.




FACTS ON FILE
[content-area databases are a whole different animal!] CITATION GUIDE

AMERICAN HISTORY, MODERN WORLD HISTORY, ANCIENT and MEDIEVAL HISTORY, SCIENCE ONLINE, BLOOM’S LITERARY online databases

 
   

Modern Language Association (MLA) Style

The following is what the FOF editors have determined to be a typical works cited format for an entry in the MLA style. There are many variations on this format, depending on the number of authors, if there is an editor, and so on. We suggest that you consult the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed., or talk to your teacher or DHS library staff for more information on writing your works cited list.
Format:
Author Last Name, Author First Name. "Entry Title." Book Title. Place of Publication: Publisher, Publication Year.

       Database Name
. Database Company. Medium of publication consulted. Date. <Source URL>.

Example:
Longshore, David. "Hurricane Katrina." Encyclopedia of Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones, New ed. New York: Facts

       On File, Inc., 2008. American History Online. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 30 Apr. 2009. <http://www.fofweb.com>.

ISSUES & CONTROVERSIES and

ISSUES & CONTROVERSIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY
 

Notes:
  1. If no author is shown, begin the citation with the article title and alphabetize it by title in the Works Cited list. If the article title begins with A, An, or The, ignore it when you are alphabetizing your Works Cited list.
  2. Abbreviate the name of all months except May, June, and July when listing the date of publication and date of access. Abbreviations are: Jan., Feb., Mar., Apr., Aug., Sept., Oct., Nov., and Dec.
  3. The MLA advises supplying the full URL for a Web publication if your readers are unlikely to be able to locate the source without it. Some DHS teachers require this information as part of a citation, so the examples that follow include it; however, it is not a requirement of the MLA for every citation. URLs that take more than one line should be broken after single or double slashes, without introducing a hyphen between lines.
  4. Issues & Controversies articles display their specific URLs as a Record URL. The Record URL is at the bottom of each article screen. To use a record URL, copy it into your citation, following the punctuation instructions above.
Example:
"Government Bailouts." Issues & Controversies On File: n. pag. Issues & Controversies. Facts On File News Services, 

        30  Mar. 2009. Web. 26 June 2009. <http://www.2facts.com/article/i1300470>.